PRINT CLOSE

KidsEatRight.org

Sugar: Does it Really Cause Hyperactivity?

by Karen Ansel, MS RD

Sugar: Does it Really Cause Hyperactivity?

Will Sugar Make My Child Hyper?

Round up a group of kids for a party, ply them with cake and soda and before you know it they’ll be bouncing off the walls, right? Not exactly. While many parents swear that sugar makes their kids hyperactive, a substantial body of research shows there’s no link between the two.

The Sweet Truth

“The sugar-hyperactivity myth is based on a single study from the mid 1970’s in which a doctor removed the sugar from one child’s diet and that child’s behavior improved,” says Keith-Thomas Ayoob, EdD, RD, FADA, an associate professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Since then, over a dozen larger studies have been conducted and not one of them has found that sugar causes hyperactivity. Interestingly enough, researchers have found that parents are more likely to say that their kids are overly active when they think they’ve consumed sugar. In one study, parents were asked to rate their child’s hyperactivity after consuming a drink with sugar. Unknown to the parents, the drink was sugar free, but the parents still rated their child as more hyperactive.

Guilty By Association?

You may think that your child is acting out during his or her birthday party because of the sweet snacks being consumed, but actually your child may be wired up because of the excitement of playing games and being with friends. Experts say you should take stock of your child’s environment before blaming sweets for hyperactivity or bad behavior. Some studies even say that sugar may actually have a calming effect because it produces a chemical called serotonin which contributes to a feeling of well being.

Get Sugar Savvy

Hyperactivity aside, there is another reason you should be concerned with the amount of sugar your child eats. When kids fill up on sugar-sweetened foods they have little appetite for healthier foods their growing bodies need, like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein and low-fat dairy. While you don’t need to restrict the sweet stuff entirely (a little teaches balance and moderation), you can offer it strategically. For example, instead of cookies and milk, try a banana and a glass of low-fat chocolate milk. Or top a small bowl of ice cream or frozen yogurt with fresh berries. That way, everyone gets their just desserts – and a side of nutrition too.

Rate this article:  Average 4 out of 5

About the author:

Karen M Ansel MS RD

Karen Ansel, MS RD


Topics


Themes


Themes

  • Cook healthy

    Involve your child in the cutting, mixing and preparation of all meals. Even a snack can be healthy.

  • Eat right

    Sit down together as a family to enjoy a wonderful meal and the opportunity to share the day's experiences with one another.

  • Shop smart

    To encourage a healthy lifestyle, get your children involved in selecting the food that will appear at the breakfast, lunch or dinner table.


Follow us online

My Recipe Box My Recipe Box

Keep all your favorite Kids Eat Right recipes in one place.