JavaScript DHTML Drop Down Menu By Milonic Tips to Keep Fruits and Vegetables Safe and Avoid Food Poising from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Welcome to the

Media Press Room

  • Normal Size Larger Size Largest SizeText Size
  • Print this Page
  • Email this Page
  • Bookmark this Page
Press Media Alerts

If you're a credentialed journalist for a media outlet, you can receive the latest issues and topics in food and nutrition delivered direct to your inbox.

 

Subscribe

Press Release

Unwashed Fruits, Vegetables Can Host Harmful Pathogens: Tips to Keep Fruits and Vegetables Safe, Avoid Food Poisoning

2012-05-22

Media Contacts: Ryan O'Malley, Allison MacMunn
800/877-1600, ext. 4769, 4802 media@eatright.org

Summer offers plenty of tasty fresh fruits and vegetables, but whether it comes from the local farmer's market, grocer or even your own garden, produce may become contaminated with harmful pathogens that can cause food poisoning. As part of the Home Food Safety program, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods reminds Americans to safely enjoy produce with tips for buying, storing and preparing raw produce.

"One in six Americans gets sick every year from foodborne pathogens that you cannot see, smell or taste but are everywhere," says registered dietitian and Academy spokesperson Sarah Krieger. "Eating any contaminated product - even produce labeled as organic or locally grown - can lead to food poisoning or even death."

Each year, 3,000 Americans die from food poisoning. In 2011, listeria-contaminated produce caused the deadliest foodborne illness outbreak in nearly 90 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Harmful foodborne pathogens like E. Coli, salmonella, listeria and norovirus may contaminate fruits and vegetables from the soil or water or during harvesting.

"Fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthy eating plan, and should fill half of your plate, but just like any food product, extra precautions should be taken to reduce the risk of food poisoning," Krieger says.

"Avoid produce with mold, bruises or cuts as these are great places for bacteria to hide and spread rapidly to other places of the fruit. Buy loose produce rather than pre-packaged and if you do buy pre-packaged, it doesn't hurt to wash bagged-lettuce or pre-washed carrots even if the bag claims they are ready to eat."

According to Krieger, it is imperative to wash fruits and vegetables with cool tap water before eating or serving; dry with a clean cloth or paper towel to eliminate bacteria; and use a knife to cut away any damaged or bruised areas. It is also important to wash produce before peeling to make sure dirt and bacteria aren't transferred from the knife to your fruits or vegetables.

"Cross-contamination can lead to food poisoning when juices from raw foods like meat, poultry or chicken come in contact with ready-to-eat foods like raw produce," Krieger says. "Using two cutting boards and a color-code system can help: one color cutting board for raw meats; and the other for your fruits and vegetables."

Just like any prepared dish, cooked fruits and vegetables can perish and lead to food poisoning upon consuming. Krieger advises discarding cooked vegetables after three to four days and to label leftovers with an "eat-by" date to know when food is no longer safe to eat.

Download the Summer Produce Safety tip sheet, and visit HomeFoodSafety.org for additional safety tips on how to properly store your produce and reduce your risk of food poisoning.

For media interviews and more information, contact media@eatright.org.

###

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods' Home Food Safety program is dedicated to raising consumer awareness about the seriousness of food poisoning and providing solutions for easily and safely handling food in their own kitchens. More information can be found at www.homefoodsafety.org.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) is the world's largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation's health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. To locate a registered dietitian in your area, visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics at www.eatright.org.

ConAgra Foods, Inc., (NYSE: CAG) is one of North America's leading food companies, with brands in 97 percent of America's households. Consumers find Banquet, Chef Boyardee, Egg Beaters, Healthy Choice, Hebrew National, Hunt's, Marie Callender's, Orville Redenbacher's, PAM, Peter Pan, Reddi-wip, Slim Jim, Snack Pack and many other ConAgra Foods brands in grocery, convenience, mass merchandise and club stores. ConAgra Foods also has a strong business-to-business presence, supplying frozen potato and sweet potato products as well as other vegetable, spice and grain products to a variety of well-known restaurants, foodservice operators and commercial customers. For more information, please visit us at ConAgraFoods.com.