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Book Reviews

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Clean & Lean Diet

Book Review

Clean & Lean Diet
By James Duigan
Kyle Books (2010)
Reviewed by Dee Sandquist, MS, RD, LD, CDE

Claims

Written by Elle Macpherson's personal trainer, this is the only diet book guaranteed to give you the beach-beautiful body you've always wanted. Simple and effective, with no calorie counting or complicated rules, it shows you how to get "Clean" by following a flexible 14-day meal plan endorsed by nutritionist Alice Skyes, PhD, RNutr, then how to get "Lean" by honing your body with easy exercise that gets results.

Synopsis of the Diet Plan

Choose clean, lean foods and drinks as much as possible. The author recommends a "cheat meal" once a week and to shop for the most natural-looking food. Also:

  • Avoid sugar.
  • Eat good fats.
  • Exercise three times a week.
  • Cut back on alcohol.
  • Avoid both stress and stress eating.
  • Eat fish and greens.
  • Remember stress makes fat.
  • Limit coffee to two cups a day.

Nutritional Pros and Cons

The book has helpful recommendations. There are food and simple exercise guidelines, plus recipes. Most of the book is science-based, with a few exceptions such as "avoid sugar."

Fourteen days is not enough time for most people to get their "best-ever body." The author gives a Bad/Better/Best chart which has legitimate choices. He includes pro-organic and, since the evidence is mixed, simply thinks it's a good idea.

Bottom Line

Clean & Lean Diet has good recommendations mixed with some opinions. The title is misleading since the average American would take far longer than 14 days to get the "best-ever body."