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Food Insecurity Can Lead to Greater Weight Gain and Complications during Pregnancy

2010-05-04

New Study Highlights High Prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Media Contacts: Ryan O'Malley, Allison MacMunn
800/877-1600, ext. 4769, 4802 media@eatright.org

CHICAGO  – Living in a food-insecure household during pregnancy may increase the odds of greater weight gain and pregnancy complications, particularly gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a new study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Household food insecurity, the inability to obtain nutritious and safe foods in socially acceptable ways, is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for many poor health outcomes among women.

Prior studies have demonstrated that paradoxically, women living in food insecure households report higher rates of overweight and related health complications. “The present study was conducted to estimate the association between household food insecurity status and maternal health during pregnancy, when changes in both body weight and overall health can be dramatic,” according to Barbara A. Laraia, PhD, MPH, RD, and co-investigators. “The results suggest that the experience of living in a food insecure household was associated with metabolic health indicators during pregnancy. Not only was living in a food insecure household associated with severe pregravid obesity—a condition that broadly predisposes women to adverse pregnancy outcomes—but also with greater gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes mellitus.”

Researchers from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and the US Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, Washington, DC, used data from the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition prospective cohort study—810 pregnant women with incomes less than 400% of the income/poverty ratio were followed through their pregnancies. This household income restriction allowed better comparison among households that might have food insecurity due to financial and material constraints. In this group, 76% were from fully food secure, 14% were from marginally food secure, and 10% were from food insecure households.

A significant finding that emerged is the association between household food insecurity and development of GDM. The authors observed that the combined group of women from marginally secure and insecure food households had more than twice the odds of developing GDM than women in food secure households, suggesting that women living in a household with any level of food insecurity may be at risk. This is an important public health finding given that GDM has implications for both the fetus (macrosomia or excessive birth weight) as well as the mother (a significant precursor to type II diabetes later in life).

Overall, women from marginally food secure and food insecure households were similar with regard to most demographic, socioeconomic and weight status variables assessed in this study. Compared to women from food secure households, women from marginally secure and food insecure households were significantly more likely to be black, to be single, have fewer years of education, less income and be either overweight or severely obese.

The authors recommend continuation of public health efforts to provide adequate funding and outreach to those in need and advocate population-based programs and policies designed to ensure that pregnant women have access to high-quality, nutritious food.

“Household food insecurity is associated with self-reported pregravid weight status, gestational weight gain and pregnancy complications” by Barbara A. Laraia, PhD, MPH, RD; Anna Maria Siega-Riz, PhD, RD; and Craig Gundersen, PhD, appears in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Volume 110, Issue 5 (May 2010) published by Elsevier.

NOTES FOR EDITORS

Full text of the article is available to journalists upon request. Journalists wishing to set up interviews should contact Elizabeth Fernandez, Senior Public Information Representative, UCSF News Services, 415-514-1592, efernandez@pubaff.ucsf.edu.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS


Barbara A. Laraia, PhD, MPH, RD
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Center for Health & Community
University of California, San Francisco
At the time of this study Dr. Laraia was a Research Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina and a Fellow at the Carolina Population Center, Chapel Hill, NC.

Anna Maria Siega-Riz, PhD, RD
Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Nutrition, School of Public Health
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Craig Gundersen, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics
University of Illinois, Urbana
At the time of this study Dr. Gundersen was an Economist for the US Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, Washington, DC.

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ABOUT THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION

The official journal of the American Dietetic Association (www.eatright.org) the Journal of the American Dietetic Association (www.adajournal.org) is the premier source for the practice and science of food, nutrition and dietetics. The monthly, peer-reviewed journal presents original articles prepared by scholars and practitioners and is the most widely read professional publication in the field. The Journal focuses on advancing professional knowledge across the range of research and practice issues such as: nutritional science, medical nutrition therapy, public health nutrition, food science and biotechnology, food service systems, leadership and management and dietetics education.

ABOUT THE AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION

The American Dietetic Association (www.eatright.org) is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. ADA is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy.

ABOUT ELSEVIER


Elsevier is a world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet (www.thelancet.com) and Cell (www.cell.com), and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier’s online solutions include ScienceDirect (www.sciencedirect.com), Scopus (www.scopus.com), Reaxys (www.reaxys.com), MD Consult (www.mdconsult.com) and Nursing Consult (www.nursingconsult.com), which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite (www.scival.com) and MEDai’s Pinpoint Review (www.medai.com), which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier (www.elsevier.com) employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC (www.reedelsevier.com), a world-leading publisher and information provider, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).